It is scary when you have lost your faith in Doctors

Discussion in 'Research, Health and Legal' started by Christina Ballerina, Sep 17, 2016.

  1. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Swan Lake
    I am not going to rabbit on as usual, because I am too upset and emotional. But my husband has a heart condition and so does my beautiful 48 yr old step son, both are being advised to have open heart surgery, but I just wish I had faith in the Doctors. The more I research, the less confidence I have, I am feeling very scared and confused :)
     
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  2. rupert

    rupert Crazy Chemist

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    All I can say is don't be.....
    All vaping information aside - There is literally no better hands they could be in outside of a hospital.

    I wish you and your family all the best with this situation.
     
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  3. Judith

    Judith Mostly harmless

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    Very stressful for you. Hope it goes well for both of them.

    I am the first person to criticise doctors but surgeons are a different species of doctor and as long as they don't have a bad rep they are usually highly skilled. If you know anyone who works in the hospital or hospitals where the surgeries will happen (especially nurses) they will usually be able to tell you who to avoid. Did they get a second opinion on the need for surgery?
     
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  4. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    No not yet, the original specialist which we were dealing with, referred us to the hospital because we had to cancel our $800 per month private insurance, which was insane. We did ask him to quote for the treatment, but apparently he won't touch any surgery unless it is insured. Then we asked his secretary how much it would cost if we paid, but she flatly refused to even give us an estimate as she said he only does insured clients? Anyhow we were assured it would be exactly the same treatment, just a different cardiologist. But yesterday the cardiologist referred us back to the original specialist, we can still see him for appointments, which is great.............but he is going to discuss the treatment which he recommends with the hospital guy. The thing that freaked us out is the guy at the hospital hoped Tim would be back next week, but we may have to wait 2-3 weeks to see the private specialist for a "discussion" on the best way forward. Unfortunately this has given me time to worry and consult Dr Google, who says that quite often a bypass is not the best way, oh bloody hell. Tim does not want this surgery, he is in no pain whatsoever and his atrial fib is fine with the double dose of beta blockers. So maybe we should leave things be, rather than the poor guy getting his chest being cut open for such a small benefit??? According o what I have researched this invasive procedure will not lower the risk of another heart attack at all. I am thinking ff's what is the point and in the meantime poo Tim has had to put his life on hold......I think I need Dr FARSALINOS LOL.
     
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  5. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Not poo Tim lol, poor Tim.
    I think private insurance is wrong, totally against my principles, there should be even stevens treatment for everyone, which was another reason why we cancelled it.
     
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  6. Jennifer

    Jennifer Pyjama Queen

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    I think what I would do Christine is sit down with the doctor, either one I don't think it matters, and absolutely grill them. What are the benefits, what are the risks, what would happen if you did nothing and continued on as now, is there an alternative treatment that he hasn't mentioned yet, what will happen after the surgery (meds?), and most important question of all....how would the doctor proceed if it was his own father (or wife, or mother, or child) sitting there in Tim's place? What treatment if any, who would he recommend to treat them and why?

    Then listen carefully to his answers, dispassionately assessing body language, personality, potential motivations, and listening to your gut the whole time. Then let your brain collate all that info until you feel more secure and capable of making the correct decision for you both.

    lol! Sounds weird I know, but that's what I'd do.
     
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  7. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Yes I agree totally JEN, THE LAST APPOINTMENT WHICH tIM HAD, NE ASKED ME NOT TO COME,, i SHOULD HAVE GONE BECAUSE i always ask questions and Tim is so polite he would never question anything. Thanks for the good advice, sorry for the caps lol.
     
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  8. margyb

    margyb Senior Member

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    I take it with the a fib not responding well to beta blockers they want to put a pacemaker in?
     
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  9. Pippi

    Pippi Mother of Pudles Moderator

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    Sorry you are so worried and stressed Christina and I understand why you would be frightened - others have given some great advice above - So I wont add to it and I know little on the subject anyway.
    Take care.
     
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  10. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Well no, the thing is that the a fib is fine now with the extra beta blockers, the problem now is that, they decided to do the angiogram to see what was going on as although they put one stent in after his heart attack 6 years ago because the artery was 90% blocked, they also said at the time that the other one was 60% blocked and the third one was so very thin they could do nothing with it. I cannot understand why they didn't do the 2nd one with the first.
    But anyhow, we just have to wait for this appointment with the specialist and perhaps he may suggest treating it with drugs alone. I did ask him about a pacemaker before and he said it would not be appropriate.
    So I guess we just wait. Tim seems a lot happier this morning, I had printed off info for him which explains the alternative methods of treatments, because I think that it is important to understand what is going on.
     
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  11. Jerry Hatrick

    Jerry Hatrick Senior Member

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    Open heart surgery these days is really not that much to worry about .
    I know you are stressing but in all honesty it has come a long long way lately and is virtually an every day occurrence that the surgeons breeze through.
     
  12. margyb

    margyb Senior Member

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    i didn't realise he had stents too after a heart attack
    my hubby had 95% blockage in one artery and 75% in the other 11 years ago. They stented the 95% one OK but couldn't reach the 75% blockage so just left it and have had him on aspirin ever since ( he never actually had a heart attack-just got short of breath)
    He seems to be going ok but he was told if the stent blocks up he will probably need bypass surgery
    Having the a-fib is trickier too in your hubby case

    unfortunately atrial fibrillation can run in families ( my mum has it and her brother had it)
     
  13. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Wow, 95 and 75%. He is doing well then Margy. Yes Tims brother has a fib, he had a cardioversion but it didn't work so he is on warfarin. Tim has had 2 cardioversions, each time they were ok for a while, but then went out of sync again. The second time his specialist tried to persuade him to go on aspirin instead of eloquist. He did try that, but felt awful and the chemist told him that eloquist is much better but a lot more expensive. Anyhow he went back on to the eloquist and felt better and then a few months ago the a fib came back and now seems fine with the double dose of beta blockers.

    I think because he went to his GP who is a lovely lady, she sort of started the ball rolling again and that is why he had the angiogram.

    Perhaps it would have been better to leave well alone. We were reading up on EECT or is it P, can't remember, but that is only done in Melbourne but it sounds amazing and avoids the need for bypass. Apparently it can also improve your circulation, his legs are like blocks of ice, it can stimulate your brain and also increase your libido lol. I did message them to find out more but I reckon it could cost a bomb. We are just really trying to understand as much as possible before this appointment.

    Anyway he is so much happier today, because he is hoping that (especially as he has no pain) that he can avoid this bypass. He is back to teasing me again so he must be feeling better, I told him that if he didn't stop, I would bump him off :)
     
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  14. Maria

    Maria Senior Member

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    I am also sorry Christina you are going through this.It is very emotional time involving 2 beautiful men in your life.Personally I believe from my own experience we do have good hospitals and specialist's Gaining knowledge from the doctor's and nursing staff I found helped.what helped me also was to write down question's before the meeting as once at the appointment some thing's went straight out of my head.I wish you and family all the best.
     
  15. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Aw thank you, all of you for the good wishes :)
     
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  16. margyb

    margyb Senior Member

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    Can he feel the a fib Chrissy? Like does he feel his heart racing and feels weak and dizzy sometimes?
    My mum had her first heart attack at 62 then found out she had a fib. She had 3 cardio versions to try and knock her heart back into rhythm .it worked for a while but she still has a heart rate >100 and is on 3 blue digoxin tablets every morning
    She is 87 now and gets around better than I do most of the time ( just has to do things slowly)

    My heart is playing up and if I go off my 1/2 tab beta blocker my heart starts racing> 150 beats a minute and I feel dreadful when that happens. Because my mum had a fib my cardiologist said I may end up getting a fib too
    And when that happens he said I may need to see the electro physiologist in Melbourne to get assessed. They can go up your femoral vein with a wire and cauterise parts of the heart where extra impulses are coming from to try to stop the
    cause of the abnormal heart rhythm They apparently do like to try drugs to get the rhythm back before catheter ablation is attempted I believe

    You know the orange bottle of GTN nitro glycerine some people have to carry and use for angina or chest pain ( spray under tongue)
    They have tablets that contain GTN that open up the heart arteries and my mum was put on that ( can't remember the name) she takes 1 daily and uses the GTN in orange bottle under her tongue if she gets a tight feeling in the chest (angina)
    I do hope he feels better soon Chrissy , try to keep your chin up I know it is hard for you cause it does worry you ++++
    Luv
    Margy
    XX
     
  17. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Swan Lake
    Hi Margy, the only way he could tell that he had a fib was if he felt totally exhausted, then he would take his pulse, he also has a BP/ heart monitor and he kept a note of the results a couple of months ago when it was playing up. He then doubled his beta blockers as his specialist had previously suggested and then within a few days it was totally settled and has been since. Blimey 100-150 is very high. The only time Tim's has got to 100 was when he was having a stress test. His can go very low, it has been as low as mid 40's.

    I have never heard of these digoxin tablets, your Mum is doing so well for her age isn't she :)

    Have you asked about doubling your dose of beta blockers on a daily basis?
    I have read about the cauterisation process. It seems that there are quite a lot of different approaches to this problem.

    Tim has to carry a spray bottle of GTN in case he get's severe pain, but thank God he hasn't actually had to use it so far.

    We are really hoping that he doesn't have a bypass. It's weird because I had some awful experiences with prescription drugs for anxiety and depression, but the more I learn about drugs for heart problems, the more comfortable I feel about this route rather than major surgery, which seems to have a lot of downsides. Maybe big pharma does have its place lol.

    I hope you can get your a fib under control, it must be a terrifying feeling. I know if I get a hangover, I can hear my heart pounding in my ears and even though it is steady it is scary.

    We have had a nice day today, I made a big batch of chicken soup and am trying to persuade him to have soup for lunch every day rather than the overload of bread, which I don't think helps him.

    Take care sweetheart xxxx
     
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  18. margyb

    margyb Senior Member

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    Hey Chrissy
    Yes I have been on 3 different beta blockers and all different strengths over different periods of time in tha last 12 months
    The only problem if you have COPD beta blockers can make it harder for you to breathe so You have to be careful
    I only take 25 mg metoprolol twice a day to try and keep my pulse down
    I get a lot of palpitations too which is not much fun
    It is just a wait and see game really but it does knock you around :):)
     
  19. Christina Ballerina

    Christina Ballerina Senior Member

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    Oh heck, I forgot about your COPD. Is there no improvement since you have been vaping?
     
  20. margyb

    margyb Senior Member

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    Yes my COPD is ok and not worse which is good all thanks to vaping :):)
     
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